Charles Reiss

Charles Reiss is Professor in the Program in Linguistics at Concordia University, Montreal. He is the coauthor of I-Language: An Introduction to Linguistics as Cognitive Science and The Phonological Enterprise.

  • Phonology

    Phonology

    A Formal Introduction

    Alan Bale and Charles Reiss

    An introduction to generative phonology using tools of basic set theory, logic, and combinatorics.

    This textbook introduces phonological theory as a branch of cognitive science for students with minimal background in linguistics. The authors use basic math and logic, including set theory, some rules of inference, and basic combinatorics, to explain phonology, and use phonology to teach the math and logic. The text is unique in its focus on logical analysis, its use of toy data, and its provision of some interpretation rules for its phonological rule syntax.

    The book's eight parts cover preliminary and background material; the motivation for phonological rules; the development of a formal model for phonological rules; the basic logic of neutralization rules; the traditional notions of allophony and complementary distribution; the logic of rule interaction, presented in terms of function composition; a survey of such issues as length, tone, syllabification, and metathesis; and features and feature logic, with a justification of decomposing segments into features and treating segments as sets of (valued) features. End-of-chapter exercises help students apply the concepts presented. Much of the discussion and many of the exercises rely on toy data, but more “real” data is included toward the end of the book. Exercises available online can be used as homework or in-class quizzes.

    • Hardcover $45.00

Contributor

  • Computation, Cognition, and Pylyshyn

    Computation, Cognition, and Pylyshyn

    Don Dedrick and Lana Trick

    A collection of cutting-edge work on cognition and a celebration of a foundational figure in the field.

    Classical cognitive science has found itself in something of a pickle; a pickle that's so deep (if I may mix a metaphor) that most of its practitioners haven't so much as noticed that they are in it. What's so good about Pylyshyn—in particular what's so good about Pylyshyn's recent work—is that maybe, just possibly maybe, it shows us the way out of the pickle we're in—from the introduction by Jerry FodorZenon Pylyshyn is a towering figure in cognitive science; his book Computation and Cognition (MIT Press, 1984) is a foundational presentation of the relationship between cognition and computation. His recent work on vision and its preconceptual mechanism has been influential and controversial. In this book, leading cognitive scientists address major topics in Pylyshyn's work and discuss his contributions to the cognitive sciences. Contributors discuss vision, considering such topics as multiple-object tracking, action, molecular and cellular cognition, and inhibition of return; and foundational issues, including connectionism, modularity, the evolution of the perception of number, computation, cognitive architecture, location, and visual sensory representations of objects.

    Contributors John Bickle, Darlene A. Brodeur, Andy Brook, Austen Clark, Michael R. W. Dawson, Jerry Fodor, Mel Goodale, Stevan Harnad, Heather Hollinsworth, Lisa N. Jefferies, Brian Keane, Zenon W. Pylyshyn, Charles Reiss, Brian J. Scholl, Lana M. Trick, Claudia Uller, Marla Wolf, Richard D. Wright

    • Hardcover $15.75
    • Paperback $8.75
  • Contemporary Views on Architecture and Representations in Phonology

    Contemporary Views on Architecture and Representations in Phonology

    Eric Raimy and Charles E. Cairns

    Leading phonologists discuss contemporary work on the topics of metrical theory, feature theory, syllable theory, and the relation among grammatical modules.

    The essays in this volume address foundational questions in phonology that cut across different schools of thought within the discipline. The theme of modularity runs through them all, however, and these essays demonstrate the benefits of the modular approach to phonology, either investigating interactions among distinct modules or developing specific aspects of representation within a particular module. Although the contributors take divergent views on a range of issues, they agree on the importance of representations and questions of modularity in phonology. Their essays address the status of phonological features, syllable theory, metrical structure, the architecture of the phonological component, and interaction among components of phonology. In the early 1990s the rise of Optimality Theory—which suggested that pure computation would solve the problems of representations and modularity—eclipsed the centrality of these issues for phonology. This book is unique in offering a coherent view of phonology that is not Optimality Theory based. The essays in this book, all by distinguished phonologists, demonstrate that computation and representation are inherently linked; they do not deny Optimality Theory, but attempt to move the field of phonology beyond it.

    • Hardcover $95.00
    • Paperback $10.75